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Rudyard Kipling The Barrack-Room Ballads, and Other Verses are a set of martial songs and poems by Rudyard Kipling originally published in two parts: the first set in 1892, the second in 1896. Many have become classic military ditties, still well known, and are closely linked to British imperialism in many minds, particularly "Gunga Din", "Tommy" and "Danny Deever". In the short span of four years, he produced, in addition to the Jungle Books, a collection of short stories (The Day's Work), a novel (Captains Courageous), and a profusion of poetry, including the volume The Seven Seas. The collection of Barrack-Room Ballads, first published individually for the most part in 1890, which contains his poems "Mandalay" and "Gunga Din" was issued in March 1892. He especially enjoyed writing the Jungle Books—both masterpieces of imaginative writing—and enjoyed, too, corresponding with the many children who wrote to him about them.[16]

 

Oscar Wilde At the height of his fame and success, whilst his masterpiece, The Importance of Being Earnest (1895), was still on stage in London, Wilde sued the Marquess of Queensberry, the father of his lover, Lord Alfred Douglas, for libel. The trial unearthed evidence that caused Wilde to drop his charges and led to his own arrest, tried for gross indecency with other men. After two more trials he was convicted and imprisoned for two years' hard labour. In prison he wrote De Profundis (written in 1897 & published in 1905), a long letter which discusses his spiritual journey through his trials, forming a dark counterpoint to his earlier philosophy of pleasure. Upon his release he left immediately for France, never to return to Ireland or Britain. There he wrote his last work, The Ballad of Reading Gaol (1898), a long poem commemorating the harsh rhythms of prison life. He died destitute in Paris at the age of forty-six.

 

Elbert Hubbard A Message to Garcia is a best-selling inspirational essay written in 1899 by Elbert Hubbard[1] that has been made into two motion pictures. Felix Shay, Hubbard's personal assistant, wrote: • A Message to Garcia was the first of a series of essays on business problems, which, when placed in the proper hands, have helped to lighten the burden on the businessman's shoulders. A Message to Garcia was first made into a motion picture in 1916 by Thomas A. Edison Inc. The silent film was directed by Richard Ridgely and starred Mabel Trunnelle, Robert Conness, and Charles Sutton as Garcia. In 1895 Hubbard printed an inspirational essay championing a soldier’s mission titled Message to Garcia in The Philistine after a discussion with his son Bert who had said “Rowan was the real hero of the Cuban war. Rowan had gone alone and done the thing—carried the message to Garcia.” First used only as filler, it was immediately praised and eventually re-printed and translated to many languages and inspired adaptations to the screen in 1916 and 1936.

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wow. I am actually new to this entire site so have been simply touring all its areas an tonite i happened across this of yours and am so thrilled finding this info on elbert hubbards a message to garcia... I had noooo idea there was a movie made ,,,,     how super neat and lands how i'd LOVE to see it but of course am sure never will...... I have the book a message to garcia and thirteen other things .... my husband   found at a yard sale yrs ago for i think was 50 cents... altho its   not in good shape at all now it is all still there and i have read it thru at least a dozen times an each time i discover something new...... thank you so much for your posting am so thrilled i happened across it..... have a great day

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