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Meissen artists

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Let me introduce you to Meissen’s most celebrated porcelain painter, the legendary Johann Gregorius Hoeroldt. He came to Meissen in 1720 from the DuPaquier factory of Vienna and dominated Meissen painting until his retirement in 1765. He was best known for his imaginary Chinese compositions known as “chinoiserie.” Many of his students continued to paint in his manner, and outside painters copied his work and do so even today. This coffeepot from ca. 1725 will be offered at auction by the Auction House Metz on April 25 in Heidelberg, Germany. The pre-auction estimate is 10,000 Euro which is over $13,000. A teapot is also estimated at 10,000 Euro, a tea caddy at 7,500 Euro. I am keeping track of the lots and will report the final sale price here. At the time Meissen was the only European Manufactory that could produce an object like this, so this piece, while undoubtedly authentic, is actually unmarked. But remember, an unmarked Meissen piece will certainly not show up in my grandmother’s attic! If somebody casually offers you an “unmarked Meissen” piece, you are still better off walking away as fast as possible. See the auction discussion group for a link to Auction House Metz.
This is so beautiful!

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